KAP - Knowledge As Power
Family Literacy

Our mission is to improve the literacy of adults, increase the school readiness of preschool children, better the performance of school-age children, acknowledge the parent as primary educator, and empower families to become self-sufficient.

KAP

At the Knowledge as Power Family Literacy Program (KAP), we believe that a holistic approach to education can significantly help families break the cycle of illiteracy, poverty, and low aspirations. To that end, our program design includes three essential components for family literacy.

These include:

  • Early Childhood Education - provided one-on-one for each child by our child educator,
  • Adult Literacy Education - based on parent's goals and implemented one on one by LV-A tutors,
  • Parent and Child Together (PACT) - tied in with weekly home visits. These are enrichment activities organized by the Child Educator and offered to the entire family. Parents are children also read together during the week.

We also believe that learners experience more success when they apply their education to real life goals that are meaningful to them. To that end, all KAP students develop goals based on "Equipped for the Future" principals, and receive one-on-one instruction accordingly.

KAP is a home-based family literacy program that provides one-on-one tutoring for both parents and children. KAP is open to families in the community who want to and need to improve their literacy skills. For information, call Literacy Volunteers-Androscoggin at 333-4785 or email: literacy@literacyvolunteersandro.org

A three-year old in a KAP family received a brightly wrapped package: a gift that he immediately ripped open. Once the paper was all over the floor, he could see that his gift was a book about trucks. His eyes lit up and we heard a soft, “Oh….” And then he turned and lifted the book up to his mother and said, “Read this to me, read this to me!” 
—Gloria Moreau, LVA Child Educatorlibrarycard

 

 

Read to the children in your life, take them to the library and do educational activities at home. When parents are involved in their child’s education, the child is five times more likely to succeed in school.